Golf-course homeowners have several tools at their disposal to protect their property from errant golf balls For people living along golf courses, glass damage from errant golf balls is no laughing matter. While the problem isn’t large in terms of total homes affected, it’s a big deal for the few that do live in the […]

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Golf-course homeowners have several tools at their disposal to protect their property from errant golf balls For people living along golf courses, glass damage from errant golf balls is no laughing matter. While the problem isn’t large in terms of total homes affected, it’s a big deal for the few that do live in the […]

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Golf course communities offer homeowners space, privacy and a slice of the action David Roberts and his wife moved to the northwest community of Valley Ridge in search of open spaces. “We liked the idea of backing on to green space, one way or another,” he said. Valley Ridge, which borders the western edge of […]

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Golf course communities offer homeowners space, privacy and a slice of the action David Roberts and his wife moved to the northwest community of Valley Ridge in search of open spaces. “We liked the idea of backing on to green space, one way or another,” he said. Valley Ridge, which borders the western edge of […]

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Looking back at 25 years of Heritage Pointe “Lots of people thought we were crazy to build way out here in the boonies,” said Carolina Oxtoby about her company’s decision to develop a golf-course community on farmland south of Calgary. It was 27 years ago when the land on Dunbow Road was purchased, and only […]

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Looking back at 25 years of Heritage Pointe “Lots of people thought we were crazy to build way out here in the boonies,” said Carolina Oxtoby about her company’s decision to develop a golf-course community on farmland south of Calgary. It was 27 years ago when the land on Dunbow Road was purchased, and only […]

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Golf and country club has been the heart of southeast community for five decades and counting Don Boykiw has come full circle. The president of the Willow Ridge Community Association grew up in the southeast Calgary neighbourhood of Willow Park before moving away to carve his own path. As fate would have it, he returned […]

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Golf and country club has been the heart of southeast community for five decades and counting Don Boykiw has come full circle. The president of the Willow Ridge Community Association grew up in the southeast Calgary neighbourhood of Willow Park before moving away to carve his own path. As fate would have it, he returned […]

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For residents of Valley Ridge, all paths lead to the links The soft summer breeze rustles through the tall stands of mature Aspen trees and prairie grasses in the lush valley on the northwest edge of the city. Here nature sits untouched, a picture perfect backdrop for the homes that grace the ridge above. Nearby, […]

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For residents of Valley Ridge, all paths lead to the links The soft summer breeze rustles through the tall stands of mature Aspen trees and prairie grasses in the lush valley on the northwest edge of the city. Here nature sits untouched, a picture perfect backdrop for the homes that grace the ridge above. Nearby, […]

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There aren’t many people who don’t trade “good mornings” with Cathy Burton when she arrives to work, and that’s one of the many things she likes about her job as head golf professional at Willow Park Golf and Country Club. “I’ve gotten to know a lot of the members,” she said, before pausing to congratulate […]

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There aren’t many people who don’t trade “good mornings” with Cathy Burton when she arrives to work, and that’s one of the many things she likes about her job as head golf professional at Willow Park Golf and Country Club. “I’ve gotten to know a lot of the members,” she said, before pausing to congratulate […]

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Calgary is home to 20-plus golf courses – a mix of private, semi-private and public clubs – plus many more in the areas surrounding the city. Whether you’re a beginner or a pro, and no matter what part of the city you live in, there’s a golf course nearby where you can hone your skills […]

Entrepreneurial couple found the right fit for their active family in Harmony Close to a year ago, entrepreneurs Brian Haydamack and Erin Schneider made the decision to move in together and blend their families (he has two children and she has three). The challenge was finding a home large enough to accommodate all of their […]

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Entrepreneurial couple found the right fit for their active family in Harmony Close to a year ago, entrepreneurs Brian Haydamack and Erin Schneider made the decision to move in together and blend their families (he has two children and she has three). The challenge was finding a home large enough to accommodate all of their […]

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For the next week, a herd of approximately 200 goats will be dining on weeds in Confluence (West Nose Creek) Park as phase two of The City’s targeted grazing program begins.

Phase one was undertaken in 2016, and we’re excited about the results. So far we’ve learned that goats can be used in an active park without disrupting park visitors’ enjoyment of the park, whether on foot, on bicycle, or with a leashed dog. Preliminary signs also indicate that the goats have done an excellent job targeting a significant volume and variety of invasive weeds such as Canada thistle, hound’s tongue, and hawkweed.

Phase two of this pilot program sees the goats return to Confluence Park so we can analyze the long-term success of using targeted grazing as a weed management tool. We will be focusing on how effective the goats are at controlling certain weeds, and how well they can do that without impacting the native vegetation we want to keep in the area. The goats will be visiting the park a week at a time, for three different weeks throughout the summer.

If you see the goats grazing while you’re in the park, please keep your distance and obey the shepherd at all times. Remember to keep your dog on-leash as Confluence Park is an on-leash park (there is a fenced off-leash area near the parking lot). These goats are working and when people interact with them it disrupts their work and can cause them distress.

If you are interested in learning about this pilot project please visit us online at calgary.ca/goats.

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For the next week, a herd of approximately 200 goats will be dining on weeds in Confluence (West Nose Creek) Park as phase two of The City’s targeted grazing program begins.

Phase one was undertaken in 2016, and we’re excited about the results. So far we’ve learned that goats can be used in an active park without disrupting park visitors’ enjoyment of the park, whether on foot, on bicycle, or with a leashed dog. Preliminary signs also indicate that the goats have done an excellent job targeting a significant volume and variety of invasive weeds such as Canada thistle, hound’s tongue, and hawkweed.

Phase two of this pilot program sees the goats return to Confluence Park so we can analyze the long-term success of using targeted grazing as a weed management tool. We will be focusing on how effective the goats are at controlling certain weeds, and how well they can do that without impacting the native vegetation we want to keep in the area. The goats will be visiting the park a week at a time, for three different weeks throughout the summer.

If you see the goats grazing while you’re in the park, please keep your distance and obey the shepherd at all times. Remember to keep your dog on-leash as Confluence Park is an on-leash park (there is a fenced off-leash area near the parking lot). These goats are working and when people interact with them it disrupts their work and can cause them distress.

If you are interested in learning about this pilot project please visit us online at calgary.ca/goats.

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On June 28, The City of Calgary presented 13 awards to recipients at the 2016 Calgary Awards. Mayor Nenshi and members of City Council were in attendance to recognize the many deserving recipients at the ceremony.

The Calgary Awards showcase The City’s priorities of community, the environment, accessibility, and arts and culture.

Highlights from this year’s awards include the Community Advocate Award presented to Cheri Macaulay, and The Citizen of Year award to Dr. Lucy Miller for her outstanding contributions to the community. The Signature Award, recognizing an individual who has brought significant recognition to the city, was awarded to Robert Brawn.

Citizen of the Year Award : Mayor Nenshi, Dr. Lucy Miller

Each year, individuals, corporations, community groups and organizations are nominated in five major award categories. It is one of the largest citizen recognition programs in the city.

“It was such an honour to present this year’s Calgary Awards to some of the very best people and organizations in this great city. The leadership and commitment to community shown by the recipients is an inspiration for me and many, many people,” said Mayor Nenshi following the ceremony. “They make Calgary better every day, and I’m proud to call them fellow citizens.”

Grant MacEwan Lifetime Achievement Award:
Mayor Nenshi, Dr. Babins- Wagner and Grant MacEwan’s
granddaughters Lynwyn Foran-Aebli and Fiona Foran

The City thanks the following sponsors for their continued support of The Calgary Awards: Oil City Press, The University of Calgary, Husky Energy and Shaw TV.

All Calgarians are encouraged to look to their neighbours, colleagues, community leaders and local organizations and businesses for those who could qualify as recipients of the Calgary Awards.

Nominations for the 2017 Calgary Awards will launch in January 2018. Visit calgary.ca/calgaryawards for more information.

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On June 28, The City of Calgary presented 13 awards to recipients at the 2016 Calgary Awards. Mayor Nenshi and members of City Council were in attendance to recognize the many deserving recipients at the ceremony.

The Calgary Awards showcase The City’s priorities of community, the environment, accessibility, and arts and culture.

Highlights from this year’s awards include the Community Advocate Award presented to Cheri Macaulay, and The Citizen of Year award to Dr. Lucy Miller for her outstanding contributions to the community. The Signature Award, recognizing an individual who has brought significant recognition to the city, was awarded to Robert Brawn.

Citizen of the Year Award : Mayor Nenshi, Dr. Lucy Miller

Each year, individuals, corporations, community groups and organizations are nominated in five major award categories. It is one of the largest citizen recognition programs in the city.

“It was such an honour to present this year’s Calgary Awards to some of the very best people and organizations in this great city. The leadership and commitment to community shown by the recipients is an inspiration for me and many, many people,” said Mayor Nenshi following the ceremony. “They make Calgary better every day, and I’m proud to call them fellow citizens.”

Grant MacEwan Lifetime Achievement Award:
Mayor Nenshi, Dr. Babins- Wagner and Grant MacEwan’s
granddaughters Lynwyn Foran-Aebli and Fiona Foran

The City thanks the following sponsors for their continued support of The Calgary Awards: Oil City Press, The University of Calgary, Husky Energy and Shaw TV.

All Calgarians are encouraged to look to their neighbours, colleagues, community leaders and local organizations and businesses for those who could qualify as recipients of the Calgary Awards.

Nominations for the 2017 Calgary Awards will launch in January 2018. Visit calgary.ca/calgaryawards for more information.

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