Property tax bills for 2017 are now in the mail and while no one likes paying taxes, we all benefit from the public services they provide. Your property taxes support services like police, fire protection, transit, parks, recreation, social services and more. You can see where your tax dollars go using the online tax breakdown tool. About 60 per cent of residential property taxes go to The City while the remaining 40 per cent goes to the Government of Alberta.

1. Property taxes are due June 30
Property taxes are due by June 30 to avoid penalties. Bills are mailed in May and cover the calendar year January 1 to December 31, 2017. If you don’t receive a bill by the first week of June you can request a copy of the bill. The City of Calgary offers a variety of property tax payment options to pay The City directly or through your bank. Credit cards cannot be used to pay property tax.

The Tax Instalment Payment Plan (TIPP) allows you to pay your property tax on a monthly basis instead of making one payment in June. Your payment automatically comes out of your chequing account the first day of every month, making paying your property taxes easier.


2. Council provides rebates to taxpayers

Council reduced the 2017 property tax increase to 1.5 per cent (from 4.7 per cent) and will cover that increase with a one-time rebate​. Additionally, the Province’s share of property tax was lower than The City expected. This created what is commonly called tax room in the amount $23.7 million. Council agreed to keep the tax room and to rebate the 2017 tax room as a one-time return to taxpayers. As a result, the owner of a residential property valued at $460,000 can expect to see rebates totaling $51 on the 2017 property tax bill.

The rebates will appear as a single credit on your 2017 property tax bill.

3. Changes in your property assessment could affect your tax bill
Your property taxes could still go up or down if there was a change in your assessment relative to the city-wide typical per cent change. What’s important is how your property value changes compared to the typical property.

If your property’s year-to-year change in assessment is:

  • Less than the typical change, your property’s taxes will decrease. 
  • The same as the typical change, your property’s taxes will stay about the same. 
  • More than the typical change, your property’s taxes will increase.

Read more about how property assessment affects your property taxes.

4. Tax increase capped for eligible non-residential properties
The 2017 Municipal Non-Residential Phased Tax Program (PTP) is a one-year program that Council put in place to assist non-residential properties impacted by the redistributive effect of the 2017 assessment process. Under the PTP, eligible non-residential municipal tax increases will be limited to five per cent (not including the effects of business tax consolidation).

5. Business tax consolidation continues
The City is phasing out the business tax through a gradual transfer of the business tax revenues to the non-residential property tax. Each year, business tax bills will go down and non-residential property taxes will increase. The business tax will be eliminated in 2019.

This year non-residential property owners will see an estimated additional 4.6 per cent increase in their 2017 non-residential property tax rate. When the 2017 business tax bills were mailed in February business owners saw a more than 20 per cent reduction in the business tax rate. Visit calgary.ca/BTC for more information.

6. Programs for those experiencing financial hardship
Under The City’s Property Tax Assistance Program, residential property owners of any age may be eligible for a credit/grant of the increase on their property tax account. Visit calgary.ca/FairEntry for more information or call 311.

Seniors may be eligible for provincial support. Visit www.seniors-housing.alberta.ca or call 1-877-644-9992 for more information. Property owners in need of immediate assistance are encouraged to call 211 or visit www.ab.211.ca for information on all support options available.

Find out more about property taxes and assessment by visiting calgary.ca/ourfinances.

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Property tax bills for 2017 are now in the mail and while no one likes paying taxes, we all benefit from the public services they provide. Your property taxes support services like police, fire protection, transit, parks, recreation, social services and more. You can see where your tax dollars go using the online tax breakdown tool. About 60 per cent of residential property taxes go to The City while the remaining 40 per cent goes to the Government of Alberta.

1. Property taxes are due June 30
Property taxes are due by June 30 to avoid penalties. Bills are mailed in May and cover the calendar year January 1 to December 31, 2017. If you don’t receive a bill by the first week of June you can request a copy of the bill. The City of Calgary offers a variety of property tax payment options to pay The City directly or through your bank. Credit cards cannot be used to pay property tax.

The Tax Instalment Payment Plan (TIPP) allows you to pay your property tax on a monthly basis instead of making one payment in June. Your payment automatically comes out of your chequing account the first day of every month, making paying your property taxes easier.


2. Council provides rebates to taxpayers

Council reduced the 2017 property tax increase to 1.5 per cent (from 4.7 per cent) and will cover that increase with a one-time rebate​. Additionally, the Province’s share of property tax was lower than The City expected. This created what is commonly called tax room in the amount $23.7 million. Council agreed to keep the tax room and to rebate the 2017 tax room as a one-time return to taxpayers. As a result, the owner of a residential property valued at $460,000 can expect to see rebates totaling $51 on the 2017 property tax bill.

The rebates will appear as a single credit on your 2017 property tax bill.

3. Changes in your property assessment could affect your tax bill
Your property taxes could still go up or down if there was a change in your assessment relative to the city-wide typical per cent change. What’s important is how your property value changes compared to the typical property.

If your property’s year-to-year change in assessment is:

  • Less than the typical change, your property’s taxes will decrease. 
  • The same as the typical change, your property’s taxes will stay about the same. 
  • More than the typical change, your property’s taxes will increase.

Read more about how property assessment affects your property taxes.

4. Tax increase capped for eligible non-residential properties
The 2017 Municipal Non-Residential Phased Tax Program (PTP) is a one-year program that Council put in place to assist non-residential properties impacted by the redistributive effect of the 2017 assessment process. Under the PTP, eligible non-residential municipal tax increases will be limited to five per cent (not including the effects of business tax consolidation).

5. Business tax consolidation continues
The City is phasing out the business tax through a gradual transfer of the business tax revenues to the non-residential property tax. Each year, business tax bills will go down and non-residential property taxes will increase. The business tax will be eliminated in 2019.

This year non-residential property owners will see an estimated additional 4.6 per cent increase in their 2017 non-residential property tax rate. When the 2017 business tax bills were mailed in February business owners saw a more than 20 per cent reduction in the business tax rate. Visit calgary.ca/BTC for more information.

6. Programs for those experiencing financial hardship
Under The City’s Property Tax Assistance Program, residential property owners of any age may be eligible for a credit/grant of the increase on their property tax account. Visit calgary.ca/FairEntry for more information or call 311.

Seniors may be eligible for provincial support. Visit www.seniors-housing.alberta.ca or call 1-877-644-9992 for more information. Property owners in need of immediate assistance are encouraged to call 211 or visit www.ab.211.ca for information on all support options available.

Find out more about property taxes and assessment by visiting calgary.ca/ourfinances.

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The City of Calgary and Alberta Transportation are working together to develop a program of upgrades to manage traffic and improve safety on Deerfoot Trail. Over the last year, the study has considered more than one hundred iterations that have resulted in five short-term improvement recommendations for future consideration:

  1. Southland Drive to Anderson Road / Bow Bottom Trail S.E. southbound basket weave
  2. “Jughandle” intersection at 32 Avenue / 12 Street N.E.
  3. Left-turn restrictions at McKnight Boulevard / 12 Street N.E. (existing Council-approved plan)
  4. Northbound ramp connection between McKnight Boulevard and 64 Avenue N.E.
  5. New northbound on-ramp from 11 Street N.E. 

Currently, there is no funding for short- or long-term improvements on Deerfoot Trail. Once funding is allocated, the short-term improvement recommendations are lower-cost options that could be implemented within two years.

Numerous short-term recommendations were generated by considering the results of more than 15 studies on Deerfoot Trail completed over the last 20 years, analyzing over 10,000 comments from citizens during the first phase of engagement in 2016, and a technical assessment of problems on the corridor today. Stakeholder workshops were held in late 2016 to gather feedback on the options.

The options needed to meet several criteria to be considered further:

  • Provide benefits for five to 10 years
  • Able to be designed and implemented within two years of being funded
  • Offer improvements for problem locations that benefit the entire corridor
  • Result in benefits that are greater than the cost within 10 years

Many improvement options were identified and considered along the entire corridor – in both directions – including for the problem areas around 17 Avenue S.E., Glenmore Trail and the Ivor Strong Bridge. The designs that will address those areas require significant infrastructure investment and do not meet the criteria mentioned above for consideration in the short-term. However, those areas will be addressed in the long-term recommendations. For more details on some of the options considered, please see the Short-term Options Stakeholder Workshop What We Heard report.

The short-term recommendations are preliminary and have been advanced enough to identify what additional land would be needed and the estimated cost to implement them. These details will help to inform future funding decisions.

To view the short-term improvement recommendations, and for more information about the study, please visit calgary.ca/deerfoot.

_____________________________

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The City of Calgary and Alberta Transportation are working together to develop a program of upgrades to manage traffic and improve safety on Deerfoot Trail. Over the last year, the study has considered more than one hundred iterations that have resulted in five short-term improvement recommendations for future consideration:

  1. Southland Drive to Anderson Road / Bow Bottom Trail S.E. southbound basket weave
  2. “Jughandle” intersection at 32 Avenue / 12 Street N.E.
  3. Left-turn restrictions at McKnight Boulevard / 12 Street N.E. (existing Council-approved plan)
  4. Northbound ramp connection between McKnight Boulevard and 64 Avenue N.E.
  5. New northbound on-ramp from 11 Street N.E. 

Currently, there is no funding for short- or long-term improvements on Deerfoot Trail. Once funding is allocated, the short-term improvement recommendations are lower-cost options that could be implemented within two years.

Numerous short-term recommendations were generated by considering the results of more than 15 studies on Deerfoot Trail completed over the last 20 years, analyzing over 10,000 comments from citizens during the first phase of engagement in 2016, and a technical assessment of problems on the corridor today. Stakeholder workshops were held in late 2016 to gather feedback on the options.

The options needed to meet several criteria to be considered further:

  • Provide benefits for five to 10 years
  • Able to be designed and implemented within two years of being funded
  • Offer improvements for problem locations that benefit the entire corridor
  • Result in benefits that are greater than the cost within 10 years

Many improvement options were identified and considered along the entire corridor – in both directions – including for the problem areas around 17 Avenue S.E., Glenmore Trail and the Ivor Strong Bridge. The designs that will address those areas require significant infrastructure investment and do not meet the criteria mentioned above for consideration in the short-term. However, those areas will be addressed in the long-term recommendations. For more details on some of the options considered, please see the Short-term Options Stakeholder Workshop What We Heard report.

The short-term recommendations are preliminary and have been advanced enough to identify what additional land would be needed and the estimated cost to implement them. These details will help to inform future funding decisions.

To view the short-term improvement recommendations, and for more information about the study, please visit calgary.ca/deerfoot.

_____________________________

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A long-time renter transitions into home ownership and begins building tax-free capital gains Nathan Magee knows a thing or two about renting. Since moving to Calgary in 1999, he has rented apartments, duplexes, houses and rooms in neighbourhoods as disparate as Bridlewood, Marda Loop, Forest Lawn and downtown. Magee rented for 14 years in Calgary […]

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A long-time renter transitions into home ownership and begins building tax-free capital gains Nathan Magee knows a thing or two about renting. Since moving to Calgary in 1999, he has rented apartments, duplexes, houses and rooms in neighbourhoods as disparate as Bridlewood, Marda Loop, Forest Lawn and downtown. Magee rented for 14 years in Calgary […]

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Making the transition from renting to buying is a lot about finding the right location with inventory that fits your budget As a single female with a career in the arts, Jamie Dunsdon wasn’t sure she could even qualify for a mortgage to enter the property-purchasing arena. “I was afraid the only thing I could […]

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Making the transition from renting to buying is a lot about finding the right location with inventory that fits your budget As a single female with a career in the arts, Jamie Dunsdon wasn’t sure she could even qualify for a mortgage to enter the property-purchasing arena. “I was afraid the only thing I could […]

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Staying one step ahead of the consumer technology bubble “Everything you see here today will be totally obsolete in four years.” Those words of wisdom came from Bill Gates, spoken to Alberta-based technology commentator Steve Makris just before Gates stepped down as CEO of Microsoft. “Count on everything changing every few years,” said Makris, whose […]

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Staying one step ahead of the consumer technology bubble “Everything you see here today will be totally obsolete in four years.” Those words of wisdom came from Bill Gates, spoken to Alberta-based technology commentator Steve Makris just before Gates stepped down as CEO of Microsoft. “Count on everything changing every few years,” said Makris, whose […]

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Eighteen questions you should ask a Realtor before hiring Buying or selling a home is likely the biggest transaction people will make in their lives. For example, the average MLS® System sale price in Calgary, as of the end of April, was close to half a million dollars. Whether you’re a buyer or a seller, […]

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Eighteen questions you should ask a Realtor before hiring Buying or selling a home is likely the biggest transaction people will make in their lives. For example, the average MLS® System sale price in Calgary, as of the end of April, was close to half a million dollars. Whether you’re a buyer or a seller, […]

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Calgary Interior Design Photos - Brian Beck HomeHow a massive flood couldn’t stop Brian Beck’s vision of a Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired inner-city home Twelve years ago, Brian Beck, wife Lynne Rennie and two-and-a-half-year-old daughter Kate, jumped into their newly acquired airstream trailer and hit the road for three months. With no real itinerary, only the desire to travel south in advance of […]

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Calgary Interior Design Photos - Brian Beck HomeHow a massive flood couldn’t stop Brian Beck’s vision of a Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired inner-city home Twelve years ago, Brian Beck, wife Lynne Rennie and two-and-a-half-year-old daughter Kate, jumped into their newly acquired airstream trailer and hit the road for three months. With no real itinerary, only the desire to travel south in advance of […]

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Do your homework to ensure your fixer-upper home purchase is a success Turn on your TV and there are shows aplenty with always-eager renovation crews turning a run-down house into something out of a show-home showcase. Browse the Internet and you can find real estate websites devoted to fixer-upper properties that just need a little […]

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Do your homework to ensure your fixer-upper home purchase is a success Turn on your TV and there are shows aplenty with always-eager renovation crews turning a run-down house into something out of a show-home showcase. Browse the Internet and you can find real estate websites devoted to fixer-upper properties that just need a little […]

Read more

First-time Home Buyers’ Plan offers a path to ownership A house can be a great investment, but saving enough for a down payment can be difficult. The Home Buyers’ Plan (HBP), offered by the Government of Canada, is a program that aids the purchase of a first home by allowing part of a registered retirement […]

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First-time Home Buyers’ Plan offers a path to ownership A house can be a great investment, but saving enough for a down payment can be difficult. The Home Buyers’ Plan (HBP), offered by the Government of Canada, is a program that aids the purchase of a first home by allowing part of a registered retirement […]

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Watermark at Bearspaw provides inviting atmosphere for young and old alike Vancouver-based Macdonald Development Corp. is known for its thoughtful community designs, often imbued with a west coast feel. It’s a vibe that resonates with residents – connecting neighbours and instilling a strong sense of community. Watermark at Bearspaw, the developer’s latest master-planned community, is […]

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Watermark at Bearspaw provides inviting atmosphere for young and old alike Vancouver-based Macdonald Development Corp. is known for its thoughtful community designs, often imbued with a west coast feel. It’s a vibe that resonates with residents – connecting neighbours and instilling a strong sense of community. Watermark at Bearspaw, the developer’s latest master-planned community, is […]

Read more